The Real Food Thread

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The Real Food Thread

Postby Ashiwi » Sun Sep 13, 2009 4:35 pm

Couldn't look at the other food thread without having to clear my mental palate afterward, so I started another one.

Rachael and I tend to enjoy discussing recipes and how to concoct new and unwholesome tastes, so I thought we could share here.

I got the basic idea for this off an old medieval recipe I found years and years ago, and twisted it to my tastes. It's highly unusual, and you might look at it and think "ewww, gross," but give it a chance and you might enjoy it, especially if you enjoy curry.

I'm going to include variants that will make it easier or more difficult, and may change the flavors a bit, so feel free to play with it.

**********

Apple Curry Soup

4-6 small to medium sized apples, peeled, cored, diced
4 cups Swanson chicken broth (I tend to prepare a chicken and separate my broth the old-fashioned way, but this is simpler)
4 large cloves garlic, minced
1 small onion, diced
1 cup dry white wine (I use Chardonnay)
2 cups buttermilk
2 cups skim milk
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp oregano, crushed
1/8 tsp ground clove
1 TB curry powder (if you're not used to curry, you might want to reduce this to 1/2 TB curry powder, if you don't eat curry normally PLEASE don't use a full tablespoon the first time then blame me if you can't eat it)
2TB butter (yes, the real stuff)
Salt and pepper to taste (I grind my own black pepper)

In a large skillet melt 2 TB butter and add your onions, garlic, brown slightly, add apples, cover and allow to simmer until they all start to soften.
Add brown sugar and simmer, stirring, until caramelized, then add wine, bring back to a simmer, cover, and cook for five or six minutes, stirring frequently.
Remove onion/apple mixture from heat.

At this point, how you go forward is a matter of what kind of soup you're looking for. You can run the onion/apple mixture through a food processor (in small batches, if necessary) until smooth (be careful at this stage, as the heat can sometimes cause a food processor lid to pop off if not sealed). Once processed, strain the onion/apple mixture and discard the solids, pouring the liquids into the broth, for a very fine texture. For a more textured soup you can simply add the entire mixture into the broth. If you're serving guests, process and strain. If you're going to adapt the recipe and add vegetables, don't strain.

In a soup pot bring chicken broth to a low boil, add onion/apple mixture (strained or unstrained) and spices, reduce heat and allow to simmer for 15-20 minutes.
Add salt and pepper and milk products. Bring back to a gentle boil stirring constantly, then remove from heat.

**********

If you choose to add vegetables to this, some complimentary flavors would include asparagus, potatoes, celery, water chestnuts, zucchini, or green beans. I personally wouldn't care for flavors such as carrots or sugar snap peas in a soup like this. Simmer your vegetables in the basic chicken stock before adding the onion/apple mixture. If you go this route, you can also add in the chicken meat (if you use a whole chicken instead of commercially prepared broth).

If you want to enhance the apple flavor, add a cup of apple cider to the broth when you add the onion/apple mixture. Or throw in a handful of raisins and an extra dash of cinnamon. Consider using cardamom, as well, but be careful of leaving seeds behind.

Instead of buttermilk and skim milk, the original 14th century recipe used cream, and I'm sure you can figure out why I don't do it like that. You can also use 4 cups regular whole milk or any variant. Using heavy whipping cream will result in a thicker soup, but you can use corn starch to thicken the final product if you prefer it thicker but without all the fat.
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Postby ssar » Sun Sep 13, 2009 11:46 pm

About 3 decades ago I peeled about a dozen fresh cooked school prawns and put them all into my vanilla-malted thickshake with lots of malt, had a few good sips, ate several prawns and decided, "never again".
Mogr -=Beer=-
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Postby Yog » Mon Sep 14, 2009 12:25 pm

Apple curry soup, so that was what they ate in the dark ages....
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Postby Branthur » Tue Sep 15, 2009 10:01 pm

Just cooked this tonight. I fully admit to taking it from a cookbook (Paula Deen), but thought I'd share. It was very good, though I think I'll make a couple tweaks next time.


Twice Baked Potatoes with Cajun Shrimp

4 six to eight oz. russet potatoes
1/2 lb large shrimp, tails removed, etc.
4 slices of bacon
1 1/2 tsp Cajun seasoning
1 1/2 tsp salt
3/4 tsp pepper
1/3 cup green onion, thinly chopped
3 tbsp mayo
1/4 cup sour cream
4 tbsp butter, softened

Preheat oven to 450F.

Coat the potatoes with vegetable oil, poke potatoes with holes and bake for approximately 1 hour on a cooking sheet.

While the potatoes are cooking, fry the bacon in a pan until crispy (for crumbling over the top later). Let bacon dry in a separate dish, leave about 3 tbsp of the bacon grease in the pan. Toss in a pinch of salt, add the Cajun seasoning, and cook the shrimp in the bacon grease for about 2-3 minutes.

When the potatoes are done cooking, let them cool briefly, but keep the oven on. Cut off the top quarter to third of the potatoes, and scoop out the insides, leaving about 1/4 inch on the sides. Clear out the tops that you cut off too, though you toss away the top skin. Mash together the scooped out potatoes, butter, salt, pepper, mayo, sour cream, and onions.

Scoop the mashed mix back into the potatoes, piling the excess on top. Pile the shrimp and crumbled bacon on top, then put back into the oven for another 5-10 minutes.

That's it.


Now, next time I make it, I think I'll significantly reduce the amount of salt in the recipe. The bacon all by itself adds enough salt, and I get the feeling I didn't get the full flavor of the Cajun seasoning because of that. It wasn't overly salty, just a bit too much. Maybe cut it down to 1/2 tsp instead of the full 1 1/2 tsp.
R.I.P. Eddie - 1967-2005
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Postby Ardessa » Wed Sep 16, 2009 9:44 am

Here's the recipe I made last night. It's great for those of us who don't like eating animal flesh! It makes a really easy side dish that's delicious.

Quinoa Pilaf

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
? cup chopped red onion
1 cup shredded carrot
1 cup quinoa
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups filtered water
3 teaspoons naturally brewed soy sauce (shoyu or tamari)
? cup fresh or thawed frozen peas

1. Heat a 4 quart pot over medium heat.
2. Add the oil and saut? the onion, carrot, and quinoa until the quinoa begins to turn light brown and lets off a nutty smell.
3. Add the garlic, water, and soy sauce.
4. Stir well and cover. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook until all the water is absorbed and the quinoa is light and fluffy, about 20 minutes.
5. Add the peas and stir to combine. Cover, remove from heat, and allow to sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Yield: 4 ? cups

Taken from: ?The Great American Detox Diet?, by Alex Jamieson, 2005
Shevarash GCC: 'Funny - sometimes we do stuff like that. Add in some neat thing like weight-dependant stun,
and THEN DON'T TELL ANYONE FOR A DECADE.'
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Postby Pril » Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:27 pm

Ardessa wrote:Here's the recipe I made last night. It's great for those of us who don't like eating animal flesh! It makes a really easy side dish that's delicious.

Quinoa Pilaf

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
? cup chopped red onion
1 cup shredded carrot
1 cup quinoa
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups filtered water
3 teaspoons naturally brewed soy sauce (shoyu or tamari)
? cup fresh or thawed frozen peas

1. Heat a 4 quart pot over medium heat.
2. Add the oil and saut? the onion, carrot, and quinoa until the quinoa begins to turn light brown and lets off a nutty smell.
3. Add the garlic, water, and soy sauce.
4. Stir well and cover. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook until all the water is absorbed and the quinoa is light and fluffy, about 20 minutes.
5. Add the peas and stir to combine. Cover, remove from heat, and allow to sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Yield: 4 ? cups

Taken from: ?The Great American Detox Diet?, by Alex Jamieson, 2005


Sigh,

You people that don't eat meat make me eat twice as much! :(
Vote Pril SOI Leader in '08!
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Postby pazak » Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:05 pm

Pril wrote:
Ardessa wrote:Here's the recipe I made last night. It's great for those of us who don't like eating animal flesh! It makes a really easy side dish that's delicious.

Quinoa Pilaf

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
? cup chopped red onion
1 cup shredded carrot
1 cup quinoa
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups filtered water
3 teaspoons naturally brewed soy sauce (shoyu or tamari)
? cup fresh or thawed frozen peas

1. Heat a 4 quart pot over medium heat.
2. Add the oil and saut? the onion, carrot, and quinoa until the quinoa begins to turn light brown and lets off a nutty smell.
3. Add the garlic, water, and soy sauce.
4. Stir well and cover. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook until all the water is absorbed and the quinoa is light and fluffy, about 20 minutes.
5. Add the peas and stir to combine. Cover, remove from heat, and allow to sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Yield: 4 ? cups

Taken from: ?The Great American Detox Diet?, by Alex Jamieson, 2005


Sigh,

You people that don't eat meat make me eat twice as much! :(



Let them eat the vegan diet....saves more meat for me!
durn sneaky elf
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Postby Ardessa » Thu Sep 17, 2009 10:55 am

Ok, let me get on my soapbox for just a second. If you examine the typical American's health right now though, there are definite correlations between increased heart disease and cancer due to excessive meat consumption.

I'm not judging whether it's morally right or not to eat it -- I'm just trying to point out that having it with _every_ meal is ridiculous, if only from the point of view of resource management.

Simple math in the form of a rhetorical question:

If 1 pound of beef needs over 100 pounds of grain to be created,
which means thousands of gallons of water are used growing the grain,
exactly how wasteful is consuming meat?
Shevarash GCC: 'Funny - sometimes we do stuff like that. Add in some neat thing like weight-dependant stun,
and THEN DON'T TELL ANYONE FOR A DECADE.'
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Postby Branthur » Thu Sep 17, 2009 12:22 pm

Allow me to get on my soapbox for a minute. Meat is tasty. :)

Seriously though, I like meat. A lot. But I would say that the main problem isn't meat, but corresponding to something you said...everything in moderation.
R.I.P. Eddie - 1967-2005
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Postby pazak » Thu Sep 17, 2009 7:15 pm

Ardessa wrote:Ok, let me get on my soapbox for just a second. If you examine the typical American's health right now though, there are definite correlations between increased heart disease and cancer due to excessive meat consumption.

I'm not judging whether it's morally right or not to eat it -- I'm just trying to point out that having it with _every_ meal is ridiculous, if only from the point of view of resource management.

Simple math in the form of a rhetorical question:

If 1 pound of beef needs over 100 pounds of grain to be created,
which means thousands of gallons of water are used growing the grain,
exactly how wasteful is consuming meat?


sorry couldnt hear you was busy chewing my blood rare steak ........mmmmm

seriously though the cancer your relating to eating meat i just dont see, i know that the hormones that is injected into cattle are causing men to create less testoserone, creating smaller men. I myself perfer buffalo to beef no added steroids there, just fresh bloody goodness :) Organic beef is hard to come by as well but personally i dont like all the extras in my meat.
durn sneaky elf
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Postby Pril » Fri Sep 18, 2009 5:02 am

Ardessa wrote:Ok, let me get on my soapbox for just a second. If you examine the typical American's health right now though, there are definite correlations between increased heart disease and cancer due to excessive meat consumption.

I'm not judging whether it's morally right or not to eat it -- I'm just trying to point out that having it with _every_ meal is ridiculous, if only from the point of view of resource management.

Simple math in the form of a rhetorical question:

If 1 pound of beef needs over 100 pounds of grain to be created,
which means thousands of gallons of water are used growing the grain,
exactly how wasteful is consuming meat?


Image
Vote Pril SOI Leader in '08!
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Postby corth » Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:51 am

Considering my local supermarket sells filet mignon for $5.99 a pound, it can't possibly be too wasteful to produce that meat. Somehow or other after all those resources are purchased by the farmer and consumed by the cow, they are still making a profit selling the best cut of the cow on a per pound basis cheaper than a lot of produce.
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Postby Ardessa » Fri Sep 18, 2009 5:50 pm

Corth, do you understand that capitalism is a zero sum notion? I'm not saying it's not _profitable_ to create meat; I instead am pointing out that in terms of sheer resource usage, it is inherently and needlessly wasteful.

Pril & Pazak , because you are both so awesome, here's another recipe. This recipe is from the same book as the other one, which was written by the wife of Morgan Spurlock (of "Supersize Me" fame).

Breakfast Tofu Scramble for One

(Note: Draining tofu releases excess water stored on the inside of the block. To press out the water, set the tofu on the bottom side of a plate, placed at a slight tilt in a kitchen sink. Add another plate to the top of the tofu and weigh it down slightly. Let drain for 10 minutes. This process will reduce the amount of water in the recipe. Double the recipe for two people.)

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
? cup chopped red onion
1 clove garlic, minced
2 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped (use either oil-packed or the reconstituted dry version)
1 cup fresh baby spinach leaves, washed and dried
? teaspoon red pepper flakes
? teaspoon tumeric powder
2 teaspoons naturally brewed soy sauce (shoyu or tamari)
1 teaspoon miso paste
1 tablespoon water
? block soft tofu, rinsed and drained
Corn or flour tortillas (optional)

1. Heat a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the oil and saut? the onion for 1 minute.
2. Add the garlic, tomatoes, spinach, red pepper flakes, and tumeric. Stir well to combine.
3. In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, miso paste, and water. Whisk until well combined, and pour over the vegetables.
4. Crumble the tofu with your fingers into small, bite-size bits. Add the tofu to the skillet and stir well to combine the tofu with the vegetables. Cook for 1 minute. Serve warm with the tortillas, if desired.



Excerpted from: ?The Great American Detox Diet?, by Alex Jamison, Copyright 2005
Shevarash GCC: 'Funny - sometimes we do stuff like that. Add in some neat thing like weight-dependant stun,
and THEN DON'T TELL ANYONE FOR A DECADE.'
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Location: LA, CA

Postby corth » Fri Sep 18, 2009 6:55 pm

Right.. but the only way that being 'wasteful' has any meaning is if you are unnecessarily using a resource that has some kind of value.

I can say that growing cows in large numbers consumes a lot of oxygen - which is an important resource. All those cows have to breath. Happily, there is plenty of oxygen, so people don't get very upset that raising cows in volume is 'wasteful' in that respect.

Whatever resource that you purport is 'wasted' is so cheap that they can grow cows on it and sell the best parts at $5.99 per pound. My wife purchased spinach the other day that cost more than $5.99 per pound! That resource cannot possibly be very scarce - and if it isn't scarce, who the hell cares if it is 'wasted'? Just like oxygen.

Put another way.. you mention that it takes 100 pounds of grain for each pound of meat, and that thousands of gallons of water are required to grow those 100 pounds of grain. My question is, what's the big deal? Apparently the monetary value of 1000's of gallons of water and 100 pounds of grain, without even giving the farmer a profit, is $5.99! Assuming the farmer is making a profit, then actually it cost significantly less than $5.99 for all that water and grain. If these resources were scarce in any way, wouldn't it cost more? And if they aren't scarce, why do we care if it is consumed?
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Postby pazak » Fri Sep 18, 2009 8:25 pm

Breakfast Steak Scramble for One

(Note: Take tofu and try feeding it to the dog watch him wimper and run away from it, cause even dogs wont eat it)

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
? cup chopped red onion
1 clove garlic, minced
2 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped (use either oil-packed or the reconstituted dry version)
1 cup fresh baby spinach leaves, washed and dried
? teaspoon red pepper flakes
? teaspoon tumeric powder
2 teaspoons naturally brewed soy sauce (shoyu or tamari)
1 teaspoon miso paste
1 tablespoon water
1 New york cut steak
Corn or flour tortillas (optional)

1. Heat a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the oil and saut? the onion for 1 minute.
2. Add the garlic, tomatoes, spinach, red pepper flakes, and tumeric. Stir well to combine.
3. In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, miso paste, and water. Whisk until well combined, and pour over the vegetables.
4. Put the steak on the preheated grill cook about 2 minutes a side or until desired degree of wellness, throw out all that other crap and enjoy your steak!

Fixed the recipe for you :)
durn sneaky elf
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